Episode 20

LIFE of PI with Jane Spicer of Daphne’s Headcovers | LAYC20

How does a ten-year-old girl, encouraged by a spirited mother, capture the attention of another very famous and influencing mother, and ultimately create several global phenomena?

Listen to this episode with wonder and discover how Jane Spicer, her mentor and mother, Daphne, and Tiger Woods and his mother and major cheerleader, Kultilda Woods, are connected in their legacies.

Daphne’s Headcovers is responsible for the iconic “Frank”, the tiger headcover, that is a signature part of Tiger Woods’ accessories and personality.

Not everyone can handle a Tiger in your boat – but Jane Spicer worked hard to build a life of Pi!

More background:

https://www.espn.com/golf/story/_/id/26869260/how-frank-became-most-famous-headcover-world 

Teaser:

Stay tuned to the end of this high seas episode when Jane reveals something you probably do not know about her yet! CAUTION – you may need a wet suit!

 

About our Guest:

Jane Spicer started Daphne’s Headcovers when she was 16 years old and has turned it into a multimillion-dollar company and a global brand. She is a Phoenix native and has lived in Shrewsbury, England and San Diego, California, but the Arizona sunshine made Phoenix home.

Jane wants to live in a world filled with innovative businesses that make the world a better place and force field around her computer that repels cat hair.

What started as a 16-year-old girl’s fundraiser to buy her first car, now soars in over 75 countries! Daphne’s Headcovers can be found on over 200 professional golfer’s bags, including legends in golf such as Tiger Woods, Ernie Els, Lydia Ko, Dustin Johnson, Nelly Korda, and more. Daphne’s Headcovers can be found in the top resorts in every hemisphere. On any given day Jane’s in-basket is filled with a dog, ninja, or pirate designs.

Ms. Spicer is the recipient of the Top Women in Business, the Spirit of Enterprise Award from ASU, Positively Powerful Women, Forbes Top golf companies, Top Female Exporter of Arizona, Conde Naste Top Golf Product, National Golf Foundations’ Most Innovative Golf Company award, Exporter of the Year, and many more. Jane is actively involved with charities internationally that speak to heart; The First Tee of Phoenix. Golf Fore Africa, Els for Autism, Marilynn Smith Scholarship foundation, and others globally. She has two amazing grown children, and four rather naughty cats. When she isn’t working, she can be found hiking, skiing, practicing yoga or sailing. One of her many passions are working with young entrepreneurs to help them see their dreams come to fruition.

https://www.instagram.com/janespicer/

https://twitter.com/DaphnesCovers

https://www.facebook.com/daphnesheadcover 

About the Host:

Isabel Banerjee - Your Next Business

Strategist and Transformation Catalyst

 

Dynamic, a self-made entrepreneur who overcame obstacles with an unrelenting positive nature, a farm girl work ethic, and a conscious choice to thrive rather than survive, Isabel Alexander Banerjee cultivated an award-winning, $10 million+ global chemical business and grew it from dining room table to international boardrooms.

Isabel’s strengths include the ability to initiate & nurture strategic relationships, a love of lifelong learning and talents for helping others maximize their potential. An inspiring speaker within both industry and community, she is a driving force behind those with the courage to foll0ow her example of thriving against the odds.

With 50+ years of business experience across diverse industries, Isabel is respected as an advisor, a coach, a mentor, and a role model. She believes in sharing collective wisdom and empowering others to economic independence.

 

Founder of the Lift As You Climb Movement (www.facebook.com/groups/liftasyouclimbmovement)

and

Chief Encore Officer, The Encore Catalyst (www.theencorecatalyst.com) – an accelerator for feminine wisdom, influence, and impact.

also

Author & Speaker ‘Who Am I Now? – Feminine Wisdom Unmasked Uncensored’ (www.IsabelBanerjee.com)

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/isabelalexanderbanerjee/

 

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If you have questions about this episode, please send me an email at Hello@TheEncoreCatalyst.com

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Transcript
Speaker:

Hello again, everyone!

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And let me say...

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You tuned in to the very right place today.

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I am over the moon with gratitude and joy and...

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Whew!

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Excitement!

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To be able to have a little time to spend with someone I want desperately to call

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my friend because I admire her so much...

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But in fact, we haven't had a lot of one-on-one time.

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We met briefly a couple of years ago at a woman's business event.

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I think we managed to squeeze in a lunch or something once in a while,

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but as entrepreneurial women...

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That are involved in lots of endeavors and doing lots of lifting and climbing...

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This is a first time for me to have a reunion with Jane Spicer.

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Who is the CEO and founder of Daphne's Headcovers.

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Jane is coming to us from Phoenix or Scottsdale, someplace in Arizona.

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Welcome to the Lift As You Climb podcast, Jane.

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Thank you very much for having me.

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I'm thrilled to be here today.

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Yay.

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All right.

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So I know, we're going to include for everybody in the show notes and in our

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social media, the opportunity to really get to know a lot more about you,

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the business woman, the entrepreneur, the ambassador for all kinds of

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good things happening in the world.

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For now, would you start us off with a little bit of the Jane story...

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We'll set the scene for our conversation?

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Oh, I'd be happy to, as you said, I'm the CEO of Daphne's Headcovers.

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For those of you that don't golf...

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Headcovers is the term for golf club covers.

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You'll see some of them on my golf bag in the back.

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I started my first company when I was 10 years old.

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I asked my mum for a sailboat and she said, Jane, think of

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a business, earn it yourself.

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So with her guidance, I started making stuffed toys and selling

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them to friends and neighbors.

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And I bought the little 16 foot sailboat as a ten-year-old and

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discovered I like making my own money and not having to ask people for it.

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So the toys then morphed into puppets.

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My mom would leave me on street corners where the little art shows.

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and I would sell puppets, every weekend, as soon as I was selling so many, I had

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to fill the sailboat with the backstop.

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I didn't drive, so my mom would take me there with a sailboat filled.

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I'd take the mast and the boom out.

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Put the sailboats in and I would sell or put the puppets in the sailboat.

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And then when I was almost 16, a customer came to us and said...

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Why don't you make golf club covers?

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And my mom, whose name was Daphne...

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she's our company namesake ... Bribed me.

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And she said, you're almost 16...

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if you sell enough headcovers...

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I'll buy you a car.

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With her mentorship and guidance, I took the puppets, made them

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into headcovers, went to the Arizona Biltmore here in Phoenix.

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Gave a really lousy sales pitch...

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and Daphne's Headcovers was born.

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I did earn that car, that was 41 years ago.

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I've been an entrepreneur since.

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I sold head covers through high school and college.

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I continued to sell them basically for beer money.

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And when I got out of college, I got a real job, which I disliked.

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So I went on the road for six years.

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I sold my car, bought a cargo van, sold puppets on the weekend at big Arts and

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Craft shows, all over the country, and then visited golf courses in between.

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After six years I had enough business, I could come off the road.

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Daphne's headcovers has been growing since, and now we're a global company

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and I'm still doing the same thing.

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Just on a slightly larger scale.

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I design and make and sell headcovers.

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Based on what I know about you and what I'm hearing today, you're still 16.

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You just have a lot of years of experience in addition to that.

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I'd like to think so.

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Yeah.

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I've got, I still have the energy.

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Absolutely.

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And maybe make a few better choices.

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Yeah,

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I see you're hiking on social media and I go...

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Wow.

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I am so impressed.

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Let me just go back a little bit.

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Did I understand you correctly to say that you took the sail and the boom

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out of sailboat and you loaded it up with the puppets and the headcovers...

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That was like a mobile boutique...

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Was it?

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That's where I put my backstock, so I would put it there and

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you'd get this 10 by 10 space, essentially a parking space-ish.

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My mom would drop me off, and we'd push a little sailboat in the back.

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I had a card table, and I would sell, and then refill from the sailboat.

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It was a good place to hold the stock.

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Then my mom would come back up, and we'd hook it up to her trailer hitch.

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I'd leave with a pocket full of cash, and no puppets in the sailboat.

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think there's a movie in this, in our future.

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How did you create all of this merchandise who was making all these.

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From the beginning, it was my mom and me.

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She was a built-in mentor.

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She taught me how to sew...

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and we cut and designed, and she was wildly creative...

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And believed that you could do it.

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She had a very renaissance spirit.

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We figured things out as we went.

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I've always been an interviewer by nature.

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, I talk to people all the time.

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How do you do this?

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What do you think about this?

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What do you do?

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She encouraged me to do that, We were cutting, sewing, selling...

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doing it all.

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When I was in high school...

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I would always talk to my customers and say...

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Okay, I don't know how to do this?

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How do you do it?

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I just did all of it...

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for many, many years.

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I don't know how you managed to keep up the sales, and the

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learning, and education, and have a social life, a family life.

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How, how did you manage to fit all of this into one woman's life?

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I don't believe that there really is balance per se...

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There was different focuses.

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Before kids, I have two grown children now...

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That's all I did.

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I was the entrepreneur...

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Who missed all my friend's weddings, because I was working that weekend.

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I missed so many things...

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And it was okay, because I had these goals that I wanted to do and build.

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I realized as I was attaining them...

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There was always trade offs.

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Absolutely.

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A few episodes earlier in the show, I talked about exactly that.

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As women entrepreneurs and mothers and volunteers, and, and, and...

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There is no such thing as work life balance.

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That term just pisses me off because it just sets us up for failure always

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striving to have that perfection.

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To expect balance means that you have to be on an even keel.

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You have to be static, and therefore nothing is moving.

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How can you possibly grow or have influence or impact

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or fun if nothing moves?

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Right?

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( Right.

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Oh, I agree.)

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It's a choice.

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Today.

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I'll put more energy into my business or tomorrow I, choose to put more energy

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into my family, my friends, myself.

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Unfortunately, invariably for working moms.

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, the, myself part usually comes way, way at the back of the line.

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Was your mom an entrepreneur before the puppets and the headcovers came about?

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No, no.

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She was corporately trained.

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Had two degrees.

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Spoke four languages.

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She was from England...

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Came here and loved the States...

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That you could just be whoever you wanted to be.

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So came from a successful family, successful career, and loved...

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What she referred to as the wild West.

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She just dove in and was like...

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Let's just do this!

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We always had something we were up to.

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this was just another one of those things that we were up to.

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She was very much about making your own path, because while she loved

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England, and we all still do...

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Societaly there were certain things that you did do, and certain

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things that you just didn't do.

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That didn't resonate with her.

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It was...

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Be true to yourself, follow your dreams and not necessarily just because your

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family did it, or it's deemed proper.

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Do whatever it is that makes your heart sing.

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I had a very wildly Bohemian upbringing when we lived here.

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We lived back and forth between here and England.

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In England it was wonderful too...

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But very, very formal.

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The combination of both, was my training as an entrepreneur.

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What a remarkable woman, I'm sorry that I missed the opportunity to meet her.

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, I know you're lost her much younger than we would have liked.

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Right?

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Certainly I was 33.

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It was very sudden, Thank you for that.

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Was it Maya Angelou?

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Who said...

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People won't remember what you did for them, but they'll

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remember how they made you feel.

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I know I've massacred that.

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You absolutely captured the sentiment perfectly.

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Jane.

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It's true.

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So I still have people coming to me saying...

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Oh, your mom did this for me.

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Or your mom did that.

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Or she helped me in this way.

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That was 24 years ago that she passed...

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If I were to leave a legacy, I'd like to leave something as close as she

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did with how she made people feel.

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She was a wonderful example.

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Thank you because legacy is top of mind for me...

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with Lift As You Climb.

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I hope through our movement...

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We'll get more people thinking about, not the eulogy that will be read about them...

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But experiencing and creating their legacy while they are present.

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How do you feel about what you are doing right now?

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And...

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Do you have some legacy thoughts coming that we might not know about yet?

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My philosophy is really pretty simple.

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, it comes from our core value...

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That we must do good while we're doing well.

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I think that comes on a lot of different levels.

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And now I'm at the level where a lot of my doing good if you will...

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Is philanthropic, but it's also lifting other people, I have a

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handful of email mentees, that my door is always open for...

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home and and office.

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How do I help them realize their dreams?

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And they're very, very diverse.

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How do I guide my grown children to be whoever they want to

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be, not my picture of things.

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I think it's the small kind deeds daily that are the most important.

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If I can do those every day, whatever it is...

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I'm living in alignment with something that's really important

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to me, and a legacy that I would like to leave, which is...

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We're all sailors, so I'd like to leave a wake of kindness.

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Perhaps the idea of leaving a legacy...

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sets it up to be...

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Well, I have to have millions or billions of dollars, and a

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Foundation named after me...

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Or at least...

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My name on a building somewhere.

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When in fact, that's not true.

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Each of us has the potential, through small gestures, through open-mindedness,

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and inclusivity, and gratitude.

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And then willingness to mentor.

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That to me is the exponential giving of legacy.

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If you are sharing your wisdom, your time, your attention.

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Where you're showing somebody that you value them enough

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to give them those things.

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Wow.

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Let's use a little ocean term here.

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That's a tsunami...

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of impact!

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Right?

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Maybe that's not a good sailing term.

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Let me,

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The impact is fabulous...

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Because you really know when a tsunamis come through...

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So maybe this is a positive loving tsunami.

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Going back to something else that you said, because, Oh my

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gosh, now I remember why I instantly fell in love with you.

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I just felt like...

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She gets me...

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I get her...

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Everything that you're saying, I go...

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Yes.

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That's what makes sense.

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And even the UN sustainability doing good while doing well.

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Maya Angelou would have said it much better.

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Right?

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But it's true...

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If we aren't creating and generating abundance, and

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action, of setting example...

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Then we're not really doing everything that we should be to be

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creating benefits for other people.

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Right

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Bravo for you, in recognizing that, and for handing that legacy down

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to your family, to your children.

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Thank you.

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As a mom, and a grand mom and a step mom, a bonus mom...

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It's an extraordinary joy...

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When one of your offspring ask you for advice...

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Cause that's not always the first place that they might think to go, but...

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When they reach that point where they respect you or value you as a human

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being and ask you to help them...

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That's like...

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Woo!...

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You've made it.

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Yeah.

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It's probably the biggest compliment that I've ever received is when

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my children come to me and say...

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hey, I need some advice.

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Or...

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My son is a very busy man and he'll make appointments and say Hey...

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Can I make an appointment?

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There's things I want to bounce off you...

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There's not a better feeling...

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I think that parent and child the relationship, it's a gift.

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If you continue to have a healthy, happy relationship...

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It's a gift that you can give to each other, based on good things,

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not because somebody needs allowance or keys to the car.

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Based on something pure, and love and respect.

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And I think that's probably the biggest compliment one can receive.

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At least that is for me.

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I agree with you wholeheartedly.

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Daphne's Headcovers is a truly global organization.

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You have footprint expanding and more and more countries all the time.

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Thanks to some celebrities in the golf world...

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you're very publicly known...

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How did you keep up with your business, as the leader of the business?

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I've done it better at sometimes than others, I've always had set goals.

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I'm huge on goals and writing them down.

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so initially I just was pushing for certain goals.

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At the end of high school, I was watching families and there were some

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dads that I thought were good examples.

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so I went and interviewed them...

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and said, ... Can I talk to you?

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I asked them...

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How much do you make a year?

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What does it take to get there?

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Why do you make this?

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Why do you do these things?

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These dads were very nice...

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the women in my family were very, very strong and had a great example,

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but I needed a good male example.

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And, they talked to me and they came right out and said...

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This is how much I make, and this is what it buys.

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This is what I do.

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They all had a kind of a same income level.

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So first I was just driven to make that.

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That was all I thought about.

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I gotta make that.

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I gotta make that.

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Cause that seemed like the way to go.

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And then once I got there...

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I had an epiphany that I loved the game of business, and how I

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was growing or what I was becoming.

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That was much more important than the dollar amount.

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So that was a big game changer for me.

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I continued to set goals.

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Then the big difference was trade-offs...

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Now that I've been doing it...

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Running full steam ahead...

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Doing my own thing...

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Doing it solo...

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Now I had a child...

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How do I do that?

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I got a really, really big lesson...

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When my son was 18 months old, my mom died suddenly.

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She was my backup and sitter.

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I would meet her in the morning, drop him off...

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go and work.

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And now all of a sudden, I'm answering the phone with an infant on my hip.

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Going, okay...

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This is messy...

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and I got a kid here...

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But the business continued.

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So, I had some messy years like that.

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Big growth years, we grew 400%, one quarter...

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and I just slept in the factory, and my son had to sleep on the factory floor,

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because there wasn't time to go home.

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Those were the times when there wasn't any balance.

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But you do it...

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You decide.

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Okay.

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My priorities were...

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I wanted him with me, and the other one was I had to take advantage

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of the opportunities that were presented for the business.

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So I traded it off...

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If you weren't business, or you weren't bringing food for my son or me...

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You didn't see me for awhile.

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That was what I chose my balance to be then...

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I didn't come up for air for years.

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My best friend would come over.

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If she wanted to see me...

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She knew where to find me.

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I was working.

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The balance has always been to your point up and down and up and down.

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I think my superpower is just like hiking.

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You just get up and do it every day.

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And some days you can't wait to get up, and you run up and down the mountain, and

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other days it's like, this is awful.

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And some days you can do the mountain twice.

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I just get up and do it every day...

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Regardless of how that balance has changed.

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At least your best friend always knew where she could find you.

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That's true.

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if she wasn't helping me with my son, she was helping me with something.

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She can tell you stories about sewing flies into frogs mouths

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and schlepping things...

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Anything that needed to be done.

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If you've got a free hand, help me...

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And she did.

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I just love this because...

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When you're in the mess, it can be really hard.

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I'm not at all downplaying or dismissing...

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How difficult it had to have been...

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You're grieving.

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You're raising a toddler.

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You're raising a business.

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And.

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.. At the same time...

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To look back in that rear view mirror...

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Obviously your son didn't resent it too much, because of the close

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relationship you have today.

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Look at how you are a vibrant, energetic person and spreading more

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and more good stuff in the world.

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The businesses is so respected, and continues to

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grow, even in difficult times.

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Not everybody wants to be, or should be, an entrepreneur.

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Not everybody, and not at every time in our lives as moms, do we

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want to work or have a business...

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But when we do...

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And we make that choice...

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It's our choice.

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Right?

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I've had pity party days.

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I've had, like you said...

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Big girl teared days...

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but would I have traded any of it?

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Not a chance.

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You brought to mind a memory, which my kids and I laugh

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about from time to time...

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That there was always an extra passenger in the car.

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When we went anywhere on a vacation...

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I always had this banker's box...

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Which was the office.

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And.

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On the 16th anniversary of my company, my daughter sent a birthday

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card to the company and said...

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Hey, little Sis...

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Here you are...

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You're all growed up!

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Oh that's wonderful!

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And so the business becomes a sibling...

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Because it's always at the table, no matter what, right?

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My daughter was in yesterday, she's home from university.

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So she's here for the summer and I've got two, which I'm thrilled about.

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So we're really having fun.

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I have two chairs in my office that they both used to sleep in when they came in.

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Well, my kids are very tall...

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my daughter's 5' 10", like my mum was...

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And she put the chairs together and said, I want to see if I can still fit...

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because they grew up either on the office floor and the chairs.

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Chairs got really small mom, and I said...

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Well, yeah.

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Imagine that...

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the chairs shrunk,

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. Yeah...

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but it becomes a part of a whole entire family, your language,

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how you think, what you do...

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It really does.

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It is not for everybody for sure...

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But then, a nine to five corporate job wouldn't be for me.

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So I applaud those people as well, whatever their path is.

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Again, you're reading my thoughts, or my episodes, because I

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recently published Unemployable.

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As an entrepreneur, we can't go back to work for someone else.

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I've tried and have learned very quickly.

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I'm really and truly Unemployable...

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after working for myself

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I'm sure, I'm hardcore unemployable.

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Absolutely.

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Yeah.

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because you are great about goal setting and accomplishment...

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I can set a lot of goals, but I confess...

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I don't accomplish all of them.

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Is there something else you'd like to do?

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Anything you can share publicly?

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As far as business goes?

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As far as Jane goes.

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My goals go into a couple of different categories.

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There's always business, there's personal there's family.

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It always involves some type of athletic endeavor.

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One of them was doing the rim to rim on the Canyon...

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26 miles in one day...

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I've done that.

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I have some other things that I'd like to do the next is to do the Camino trail.

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That's something that I'd like to do.

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There's different places that I want to ski.

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I've skied almost all over the world, but I haven't skied in Chamonix...

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I want to do that.

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And I want to do a season where I go from skiing in North America...

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and then go to Chile and ski.

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So I don't miss the ski season...

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A lot of places that I want to sail...

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I'm always training for something.

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Right now, I'm training for the three highest peaks in the

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Mount Charleston area in Nevada.

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They're not huge, but it'd be good Summer fun...

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beautiful hikes.

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I've always got something within my training process, that I'm working for...

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and business constantly looking for growth.

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There's usually a list of...

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Okay, what's next?

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How can I grow?

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How can I do something different?

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Does any of this experience for you?...

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Show up in products for Daphne's?

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Oh, absolutely.

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A lot of my designs come from customers and their suggestions, but there are ones

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on there that have to do with my travels.

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There's a tree frog that's on our hybrid line.

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That was from an amazing, sailing trip in Îles des Saintes.

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There's a Sloth, from a trip to Costa Rica.

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I get influenced where I am looking at different things.

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I'm constantly looking.

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I love all animals Wherever I go, if I can...

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I love the city and the urban vibe.

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And then if I can get into the countryside, many

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different designs come about.

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My Great Horned Owl, comes from where I live in North of Scottsdale and Carefree.

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We've got a nest with Great Horned Owls.

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I'm constantly watching and wherever I'm at, I feel like I'm here to learn and

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observe, and see what else I can see.

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I'm so glad you're not missing life, you're present for it.

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What about your cats?

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How do they feel about the Owl?

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Oh, they don't go out.

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So when they're teaching their babies to hoot...

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Cats are very, very interested, but with a huge predator in the

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tree, the cats don't go out...

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But they sure listen, and if, they see them, they do that marvelous

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thing where cats flatten themselves and their ears go out straight...

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It's pretty cool...

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The Owls are bigger than the cats.

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So they're remarkable birds.

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Regrettably, I learned the hard way two years ago.

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We lost our dear Stevie our 16 pound Ragdoll to a Great Owl.

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Sorry.

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Yes.

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Thank you for that.

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It was a hard lesson for us...

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Not having lived in an area with predatory birds before.

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I just wasn't prepared for how serious that could be.

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No grudge against the owl.

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Well, after a while I felt that way, because it's all

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part of the cycle of life.

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I would love to talk with you for days and days and days, Jane.

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You've got my mind clicking and whirring, and dinging, about how marvelous it

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is, to embrace the opportunities.

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In fact, I recently interviewed somebody on the podcast.

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I think this is just so smart.

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I'm getting again to reconnect with a lot of women globally, because of the podcast.

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The woman that I met is an ex-pat from the US, who is now full time in Italy.

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Her name is Liz Sumner, and her podcast is...

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I Always Wanted To...

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Oh, what a great name.

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isn't that amazing?

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I think that you're one of the people who always just did.

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I love to be able to present this...

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And to say to everyone out there, come on...

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There are opportunities...

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We are so privileged in this society, to be mobile enough, and affluent

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enough, and be able to research and learn so easily on the internet.

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Don't wait until tomorrow because, there may not be a tomorrow.

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Live your legacy...

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Now, and really have that impact that you can.

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All right.

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Before I let you go, I do, love to have some fun, with my guests, and ask...

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If you would share with our audience...

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Something that they might not find out about you on Google.

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Probably the thing that comes to mind is when you talked about

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balance, and different things...

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For basically eight years, I lived on a sailboat while I was running the company.

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So I ran Daphne's barefoot with a laptop, on the back of a sailboat.

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And you could do it.

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The company was here in Phoenix.

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The sailboat was in San Diego.

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My son was sailing competitively and we wanted to support what he was doing.

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I would get up in the morning, in the galley make breakfast...

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Kids would go off to sailing training.

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My office was a laptop in the back of the sailboat or a sand

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chair at a regatta somewhere...

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and it could be done!

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The technology was just wonderful.

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I had a great staff that I checked in with, I flew back as I needed to.

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During a busy time I was able to do it fairly seamlessly.

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People didn't know where I was, but I was able to respond to things...

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and be there for my kids.

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Well, about eight years of it was spent barefoot with a wonderfully uneven

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tan, and a laptop that always had sand on it, as I ran the company, I'm

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so grateful to technology for that.

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I would never have guessed that.

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I'm so happy, you shared that insight.

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I'm just thinking about how, that's the opposite metaphor of rocking the boat.

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Yeah

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Yeah.

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You rocked the world...

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Your world.

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Yeah

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Doing it your way.

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Very much so...

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my kids are very energetic, and I wanted kids that were up and out,

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and doing something different.

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You can't in a Phoenix Summer when it's hot.

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Say go outside, all the time.

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It's too hot.

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I didn't want them playing inside, playing video games all the time.

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Opportunity came...

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It just became highly, highly, highly organized.

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These kids would get up at five o'clock on Monday mornings, and be on the seven

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o'clock flight back to school, eat a burrito on terminal four, did homework

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on airport seats, and as a result...

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They're incredible travelers.

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I've taken them all over the world.

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It's what they learned at a young age.

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It taught me that, I don't have to just be in the office all the time...

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With good people, and great organization, you can really run your

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business, and do what you need to.

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You can reach people everywhere because technology is so fabulous.

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Coincidentally, isn't that what so many people have just

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learned through the pandemic?

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Yes.

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Absolutely.

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We don't have to have a brick and mortar for everything.

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We can work anywhere, anytime with anyone.

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I know for myself, and I talk about this with many friends...

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Is knowing who showed up for you...

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and you showed up for them.

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Jane, thank you so much for this generous sharing.

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I'm thrilled and I wish you continued adventure, and growth and success.

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I gotta tell ya...

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Those two kids are very fortunate to have you as a mom.

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Thank you very much.

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Alrighty.

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We will be sharing where you can find and follow the escapades of

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Jane Spicer, her cats, and Daphne's Headcovers, in the show notes.

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Thank you, talk to you soon.

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Bye-bye

About the Podcast

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Lift As You Climb
Live Your Legacy; Empower Others to Create Theirs

About your host

Profile picture for Isabel Banerjee

Isabel Banerjee

Dynamic, self-made entrepreneur who overcame obstacles with an unrelenting positive nature, a farm girl work ethic and a conscious choice to thrive rather than survive, Isabel Alexander Banerjee cultivated an award winning, $10 million+ global chemical wholesale business and grew it from dining room table to international boardrooms.

Isabel’s strengths include the ability to initiate & nurture strategic relationships, a love of lifelong learning and talents for helping others maximize their potential. An inspiring speaker within both industry and community, she is a driving force behind those with the courage to follow her example of thriving against the odds.

With 50+ years of business experience across diverse industries, Isabel is respected as an advisor, a coach, a mentor and a role model. She believes in sharing collective wisdom and empowering others to economic independence.

Isabel Banerjee
Your Next Business Strategist and Transformation Catalyst